The Frog Rock coastal reserve has been worn away by increased access and weather events. Picture: Supplied
The Frog Rock coastal reserve has been worn away by increased access and weather events. Picture: Supplied

4WD damage prompts plan to preserve Frog Rock

A PICTURESQUE coastal reserve that has been worn away by cars and campers could soon be saved, with the council set to give residents their say on a new management plan.

The Frog Rock coastal reserve is found on the western side of Gloucester Peninsula about 5km from Hydeaway Bay.

The reserve is about 800m long and covers a total of 8.5ha.

Cape Gloucester resident Michael Begun said over the past three years, traffic to Frog Rock had increased.

"People tend to like to drive right down to the beach," he said.

"There have been a number of tracks that have been opened up from Gloucester Road down to the beach itself."

A management plan for the Frog Rock reserve will be put to the public. The are has been eroded by a combination of weather and vehicle access. Picture: Supplied
A management plan for the Frog Rock reserve will be put to the public. The are has been eroded by a combination of weather and vehicle access. Picture: Supplied

Mr Begun said cars driving down to the beach were causing damage to shrubs and plants while also eroding the foreshore.

"It wouldn't take a very large rain event to start washing the whole thing away," he said.

"From my perspective, it's already pretty bad and if we don't do something about it, we could end up having all the plant life on the foreshore start to wash away."

In the ordinary council meeting this week, councillors discussed a management plan to help maintain the reserve.

The plan includes several guidelines to help protect the area, including restricting 4WD access to the beach, providing carparking spaces and rehabilitating areas that have been damaged.

Bollard fencing and boulders would be used to block access to cars and about 1200 sqm of land would be revegetated.

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The project would total between $100,000 and $200,000 and is set to be placed on public display for 30 days before being brought back to the council.

The council will then review the plan with recommendations from officers before any work begins.

Mr Begun hoped the project would go ahead, saying it was important in preserving one of the Whitsundays' iconic beaches.

"If it doesn't happen, I think we'll see the foreshore just wash away," he said.

"It's about retaining the beauty of the area."