'THE CAGANER' is an unusual Christmas icon that represents the figure of a defecating man, which is popular in the Catalonian region of Spain.
'THE CAGANER' is an unusual Christmas icon that represents the figure of a defecating man, which is popular in the Catalonian region of Spain. J2R

6 crazy Christmas traditions from around the world

PEOPLE around the world celebrate Christmas in many different ways, but some Christmas traditions are stranger than others.

Which of these could you get behind?

Japan

Now this is a tradition we could get on board with.

After a clever marketing campaign in the 70s, it has become tradition for the Japanese to order KFC for their Christmas feast.

It's handy if you don't have time to prepare the Christmas roast!

A Japanese family is having Christmas lunch at their home.
How would this Christmas tradition go down in your household? recep-bg

Catalonia (Spain)

This one definitely wins the award for the strangest Christmas tradition... and possibly the stinkiest.

"The Caganer” is a little figurine that appears in household nativity scenes throughout the Catalonian region of Spain, depicting a little peasant man defecating in a squatted position.

The origins of the tradition are unknown, but it is said to date back to the 17th century.

Norway

Norwegians really get into holiday mode with a national ban on cleaning.

Brooms are hidden away on Christmas Eve so they won't be stolen by evil spirits or witches.

Let's just hope Santa doesn't mind a dusty chimney.

Venezuela

This one takes a little more skill.

Going to Christmas mass is common throughout the globe, but in Venezuela they zip to church on roller-skates.

Germany

As the inventors of sauerkraut, we know the Germans are crazy about their pickles.

But did you know that Germans traditionally hide a pickle in the Christmas tree?

The first child to find the pickle on Christmas day gets a special prize.

Philippines

The party never stops in the Philippines, where people jump straight from one holiday to the next.

Swapping their Halloween pumpkins for tinsel and baubles, Christmas celebrations begin on November 1 and keep going right up until Christmas day.