FAMILY TIES: (From left) Justine Woodbridge, Adam Brunton and Ron Duncan have started a business to revive traditional indigenous medicine by creating a tea called Eurah.
FAMILY TIES: (From left) Justine Woodbridge, Adam Brunton and Ron Duncan have started a business to revive traditional indigenous medicine by creating a tea called Eurah. Elyse Wurm

Indigenous medicine relieves blood pressure, skin conditions

SIPPING a tea created by three Warwick entrepreneurs will not only help keep your body fit and strong, but revitalise an ancient form of indigenous medicine.

Cousins Adam Brunton and Ron Duncan, along with Adam's partner Justine Woodbridge, have developed Eurah, a medicinal product that comes in capsule form and as tea leaves.

Mr Brunton said the trio wanted to share their ancient secrets for healing that had been passed down through generations of the Gomeroi people.

The Gomeroi people were known as great healers and their traditional medicine plants were known as Eurah.

"We've been using this stuff for a long time and we decided to share it with everyone," he said.

"We were pharmacists for thousands of years, with things like honey and animal fat.

"We did it as naturally as possible."

The tea is created from different raw materials from western Queensland, where the family grew up.

Mr Brunton said there was evidence the product had a variety of health benefits including helping relieve skin conditions, blood pressure and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Researchers have also found Eurah can help fight bacteria, viruses, allergies and inflammation.

Helping heal people is not the only aim of the business, as they wish to use the profits to invest in restoring medicinal indigenous plants.

"By doing it this way, we want to fund a nursery to restore them back into our land," Mr Brunton said.

"Due to farming they get damaged and destroyed.

"Through this we appreciate our culture more and we see the value in our land, if our land's not thriving we're not."

The trio have been working on Eurah for about a year, with Ms Woodridge recently coming on board to help out full time.

Mr Brunton hoped sharing this new form of healthcare would also help people better understand indigenous culture and spirituality.

"A lack of exposure with other people (means) people don't get a chance to see what this really is," he said.

"A lot of our family is very proud to see this part of their culture shared."

For more information about Eurah or to purchase the products, email eurahaustralia@gmail.com.