BRUTAL: Family pet killed, others mauled in horror attack

14th November 2017 4:46 PM
UPDATED 15th November 7:06 AM
SHOCK ATTACK: Tammie Conroy with Cassie, the pet ewe that suffered mauling to her body and udder in a vicious dog attack. SHOCK ATTACK: Tammie Conroy with Cassie, the pet ewe that suffered mauling to her body and udder in a vicious dog attack. Jonno Colfs

SAVAGE dogs have wreaked havoc in Warwick, with one pet dead and five others ripped open and lucky to be alive.

On Sunday morning Tammie Conroy looked out on her parent's back paddock on Inverleigh Rd and noticed something was wrong, very wrong.

After a closer look, five of their stud Dorper ewes had been mauled in a frightening night-time attack.

One lamb was missing completely.

Tammie's mum, Bronnie Reid, said the family was horrified their pets had gone through such an ordeal.

"We so shocked and really sad about it all at first," she said.

"These were the animals we're the closest to, they are pets and it's horrible.

"I guess we're lucky we only lost one. We've been here ten years and this has never happened before and now we're living with the fear it might happen again."

About 15 sheep and one ram were in the large paddock, which is netted on three sides.

Also on the property, not 100m away is a small feedlot with over 150 lambs.

Upon closer inspection, dog tracks were found at the fence at the far end of the paddock.

"They were huge too," Miss Conroy said.

"Massive paw prints and judging by the tracks in the area, I suspect there were probably two dogs.

"And the bite marks on the animals, a very big dog has done this."

Mrs Reid said some people had pointed the blame at wild dogs.

"I grew up at Karara and we had issues with dingoes out there," she said.

"Dingoes kill, they don't wound and leave.

"This looks like a bit of a game to some domesticated dogs, somebody's pets.

"It's really sad, because someone out there probably has a pretty good idea their dog or dogs have been up to no good - they'd have blood all over them and possibly brought a lamb home with them or saw my Facebook post about the attacks."

Miss Conroy said the ewes were attacked in ways that showed their attackers weren't killing for food.

"Usually a dingo or wild dog will go for the stomach, it's the easiest part to get at," she said.

"Our ewes have bites on the neck, rump, udder and back.

"It's probably a chase or game that's turned nasty.

"There's no doubt the ewes would have all being trying to protect their lambs and the ram is limping as well - he wasn't bitten but must have fought back."

The ewes are no all in pens close to the house, but the worst injured, a ewe named Cassie, who also lost one of her lambs is in the house yard recuperating.

"Her udder has been torn apart," Miss Conroy said.

"She can't feed her other lamb - we're having to bottle feed it.

"All the injured sheep are requiring twice-daily antibiotics and dressings to keep the flies away.

"It's a real shame."

Ms Conway said she worried how much worse it could have been.

"Recently we sold a few lambs for $160 a head, if we'd lost just 10 from the feedlot, it's a lot of money," she said.

"Not to mention the amount of animals and pets in the area here - between us and all our neighbours there are dozens of cows, calves, chooks, horses, foals and goats."

Mrs Reid said she wanted dog owners to take responsibility.

"Know where your dogs are," she said.

"Keep them secured at night and make sure they're not getting out.

"I understand that dogs will be dogs and mistakes happen but please be careful - these animals are our pets and seeing their stress and pain is just horrible."