Clinton Paxton, pictured with his wife Giuseppina Paxton, was involved in a motorcycle accident on July 30th which resulted in a broken pelvis. Picture: Shae Beplate.
Clinton Paxton, pictured with his wife Giuseppina Paxton, was involved in a motorcycle accident on July 30th which resulted in a broken pelvis. Picture: Shae Beplate.

Crash wipes memory of motorbike rider

CLINTON Paxton does not know if he will be able to work again after he was hit by a truck while riding a motorbike which left him with life-changing injuries.

The Rangewood labourer's pelvis was fractured and had blood clotting in his abdominal wall.

Mr Paxton was thrown from his bike after being hit by a truck which drove through a red light at the intersection of Hervey Range Rd and the Ring Rd about 5.45am on July 30.

He does not remember the crash.

"Basically all I remember was riding along Hervey Range Rd. What I do know is from the police report, all I know is from the police report," he said.

"I can't weight bare at all for six weeks. I'm totally reliant on my wife and family.

"I don't think people realise how much it changes your life."

Mr Paxton received treatment in Brisbane and Townsville.

He has since returned home, and is bedridden.

Mr Paxton said it would take about three months before he could walk again.

"As far as going back to work again, I don't know," he said.

"I had another (crash) about 23 years ago. That was in Mount Isa, I had a broken leg. It took me about 6 years to get on a motorbike again.

"This one is far more serious. I'm not even contemplating getting on a motorcycle anytime soon."

Mr Paxton hoped to raise more awareness on the vulnerability motorcyclists faced on road.

"It's happened to me but I'd hate to see it happen to another person," he said.

Mr Paxton said he had lodged a work compensation claim.

Shine Lawyers Townsville branch manager and Special Counsel Garreth Turner said motorbike riders were more easily injured.

"The reality is motorbike riders are less protected than ordinary motorists so there's no prize for guessing who comes off second best when a collision takes place," Mr Turner said.

"Even when a crash happens at low speed, motorbike riders often end up with life-changing injuries."

He said Queensland Road Safety Week was a timely reminder for everyone to be diligent on the roads, whether riding a motorbike or driving a car.

"Every year for the past 5 years, more than 200 people have been killed on Queensland roads. That's more than 1000 preventable deaths, yet as a community we've almost become accustomed to these horrific figures," he said.

"I would urge everyone to slow down and take care because it only takes one small lapse in concentration to permanently alter your life or that of an innocent stranger."