KIND GESTURE:  Children of Dr Robert Goodwin,  George Goodwin and Lois Speed hand  The Lamp is Heavy   by   Dr Judith Best to Annette Redgwell and Yvonne Nowel who accepted the painting on behalf of Warwick Hospital.
KIND GESTURE: Children of Dr Robert Goodwin, George Goodwin and Lois Speed hand The Lamp is Heavy by Dr Judith Best to Annette Redgwell and Yvonne Nowel who accepted the painting on behalf of Warwick Hospital. Elyse Wurm

Donated painting a piece of two special Warwick doctors

ROBERT Goodwin OAM is remembered as a kind, giving doctor who always put his patients first.

Now a little piece of his legacy, along with that of a special colleague, will live on at Warwick Hospital.

Dr Goodwin's children George, Chris, Jim and Lois, have given the hospital a painting by fellow Warwick doctor, Dr Judith Best.

Dr Best painted it and gave it to their father who hung it in his study for many years.

The two doctors worked together as colleagues and medical partners in 1959-1970.

Dr Judith Best and her husband Dr John Best ran a private practice on Guy St for 50 years.

The couple gave greatly to the community, being recognised as the founders of the Warwick blood transfusion service and voluntarily attending the clinic every week for more than 40 years.

Dr Judith Best also gave voluntary lectures to nurses in training at Warwick Hospital.

Aside from being a compassionate doctor, Dr Judith Best was also a keen botanist with an artistic flair.

She gifted the painting The Lamp is Heavy to Dr Goodwin.

His daughter Lois Speed said when he died in August aged 97, the family decided to give the painting to Warwick Hospital.

"Dad really loved it, it was a talking point,” Mrs Speed said.

"It was just a little part of Warwick's medical history.”

She said her father was compassionate and respected among his peers.

"He was a very dedicated and devoted rural practitioner,” she said.

The painting isn't Dr Goodwin's only legacy.

He was also the driving force behind installing defibrillators in every ambulance.

Along with the QCWA, he was also a driving force behind the introduction of cardiophones in rural and regional Queensland.

Judith Best died in 2002.