Felicity Madsen and Erin, Marney and Riley Roche with have to find somewhere new to store their Christmas tree after a storm destroyed their garden shed.
Felicity Madsen and Erin, Marney and Riley Roche with have to find somewhere new to store their Christmas tree after a storm destroyed their garden shed. Michael Nolan

GALLERY: Freak storm rips through trees, flattens sheds

TUESDAY'S freak storm at Canningvale felled trees, wrecked fences and irrigation gear, and destroyed a family's clothesline.

But most of the damage was contained to within a few kilometres of the eye of the storm.

Harrison Rd dairy farmer Shane Roche was milking cows when the storm hit and said the rain came in sideways.

"I didn't realise how bad it was until I left the dairy," he said.

Mr Roche emerged to find half a dozen trees stripped of their limbs and his garden shed blown away.

"I guess I'll have to replace it," Mr Roche said.

Despite the damage, the moisture was welcomed with about 20mm registered in the Roches' rain gauge.

Further down the road Alisa and Marcus Stewart got slammed.

The wind blew their family's trampoline into their clothesline and snapped it clean in half.

About a dozen trees were knocked over, one crushed the vegie garden while another destroyed a fence.

The chicken coop lost its roof.

Mrs Stewart said the storm came out of nowhere.

"It was pretty ferocious and it hit really quickly," she said.

"I was shutting windows on the south side of the house but it got to the stage where the wind ripped through and blew all the doors open.

"My daughter Natalia was trying close the windows and her hand got slammed in the timber door at the top of the stairwell.

"She just received some bruising and cuts, thankfully nothing is broken, but she got a fright."

As the storm picked up Mrs Stewart hid her kids in a wardrobe and set about closing as many windows as possible, but it was too late.

"The water was coming in under all the window sills and doors.

"It got calm for a while but then it picked up and came from a different direction, it was bit scary.

"I'm normally quite brave, but this got the better of me."

The Stewarts estimate they had about 30mm of rain, but it's hard to be sure as the storm blew their rain gauge off its post.

To the south of the Stewarts, sheep grazier Nick Ley was also caught off guard.

"The storm was massive, it started as a big dust storm at about 4.30pm and then came the wind and rain from the south-east," he said.

"The dust was so thick I couldn't see my neighbour's place."

It bowled his side-roll irrigation line about 450m down the paddock and blew loose tree branches across his farm.

The wind and debris tore the downpipes from the side of Mr Ley's home and sadly the rain poured onto the ground and not into his storage tanks.

"It twisted PVC downpipes clean off," Mr Ley said.

A number of sheets of corrugated iron were blown over the top of Mr Ley's home.

At the time Mr Ley thought his roof was falling apart, but they were left over sheets he had tied up near a shed.

"They had cut through the rope," he said.