The Wallabies are jubilant as Kurtley Beale runs in to score in last week's Bledisloe Cup Test in Perth.
The Wallabies are jubilant as Kurtley Beale runs in to score in last week's Bledisloe Cup Test in Perth.

Go for it, Campese tells Wallabies

UNPREDICTABILITY - that is the watchword from Wallabies legend David Campese for Michael Cheika's Wallabies tonight when they seek to end a 33-year drought at Eden Park.

A rare win at the home of New Zealand rugby would also secure a first Bledisloe Cup success in 17 years for Australia, and Campese, a try-scorer in the Wallabies' last Auckland victory in 1986, says doing what the All Blacks don't expect will be key to glory.

One of the most unpredictable players to ever pull on a Wallabies jersey, Campese reckons keeping the reigning world champions guessing will go a long way to Australia winning tonight.

"They just have to turn up with a purpose and don't go into their shell," said Campese, now an analyst for Fox Sports.

"The All Blacks are very vulnerable when you have players who are unpredictable.

"In our days we had the Ella brothers, we had Michael Lynagh and Tim Horan, we had some really good players who could keep the opposition guessing.

"Kurtley Beale is a fantastic player and is the type of player the All Blacks don't like.

"We didn't see a lot of him last week although he scored a fantastic try, but he's the kind of player you look to when the pressure's on.

"We should never lose that unpredictability in our team, but we have lost it for a few years now."

Kurtley Beale is shaping as  the Wallabies' X-factor. Picture: Darren England/AAP
Kurtley Beale is shaping as the Wallabies' X-factor. Picture: Darren England/AAP

Campese said although there was no point looking back to last week's game, the Wallabies had shown the way to conquer the All Blacks.

"That's history," he said of last week's 47-26 win in Perth.

"You can't rely on last week to get you through this week. The Wallabies did do something different last week that we haven't seen for years.

"The grand-slam side of 1984 went over to Europe and also played a style that no one had seen before.

"For some reason we have been courting this pod system that the All Blacks started and everyone in the world does the same thing. You don't have to do what the Kiwis do and we saw last week ... they (the All Blacks) were a bit shocked."

Campese said the Kiwis' "spiritual home" of Eden Park had always been an advantage for the All Blacks, but Australia could prevail with the right attitude and a good game plan.

The 1986 win at Eden Park ensured the Wallabies won the Bledisloe Cup series that year 2-1 - all in New Zealand.

"That showed you can beat the All Blacks at home if you have the right mental process," Campese said.

"They just have to play the game minute by minute. Don't look at the scoreboard, keep the ball away from then and when you are in their 22, don't panic.

"Just believe in your ability and go for it."