TAKE CARE: Former water police officer Andrew Gale says  hazards are emerging from Leslie Dam as the water level declines.
TAKE CARE: Former water police officer Andrew Gale says hazards are emerging from Leslie Dam as the water level declines. Toni Somes

Hazards emerge from beneath surface as dam water dwindles

LESLIE Dam is revealing "undiscovered country” as the water recedes to expose formerly submerged hazards such as rocks, trees and timber.

Former water police officer and boat licence instructor Andrew Gale said shallow water was a hazard.

It was lucky cold weather was deterring most people from entering the water, Mr Gale said.

"If we still have these water levels in the summer time, everyone needs to be aware of their obligations of how to operate a boat safely,” he said.

"You put a bit of traffic in there, you put some fishermen, with the narrowness of the water ways now I doubt it would be safe to water ski.”

Mr Gale said no matter how high the water level was, most hazards were at the shoreline.

"If someone drives a boat onto a sand bank at speed, the boat will stop but the passengers might keep moving and that's a concern,” he said.

A yellow buoy has been placed in Leslie Dam to mark shallow water opposite Washpool Reserve.

But Mr Gale said the water level was so low, the buoy was lying on its side.

"You can walk out there 100 metres from the shoreline and only get ankle deep,” he said.

A yellow buoy placed in Leslie Dam for safety is lying on its side as water is too shallow for it to stand straight.
A yellow buoy placed in Leslie Dam for safety is lying on its side as water is too shallow for it to stand straight. Andrew Gale

Black soil around the dam was also causing issues, and Mr Gale said he had seen numerous cars become bogged in the mud.

Mr Gale, who lost a friend in a towing accident, urged people to take care to avoid dangerous situations.

SunWater owns Leslie Dam and has installed general safety warning signs around the water to ensure people are aware of potential hazards.

A SunWater spokesman said the organisation would continue to monitor conditions at the dam and collaborate with stakeholders including Maritime Safety Queensland where required.

"We encourage users who operate watercraft and undertake recreational activities at the dam to be mindful of current conditions,” he said.

Mr Gale urged people to take safety seriously by wearing life jackets, travelling to appropriate speeds and not being irresponsible with alcohol around water.

"It saddens me because boating is about enjoying yourself and having fun and it's all the more tragic when something happens,” he said.