FIGHT FOR RECOVERY: Paul Reid has started the Fitter for Life program with hope he will go bushwalking again.
FIGHT FOR RECOVERY: Paul Reid has started the Fitter for Life program with hope he will go bushwalking again. Chris Lines

Hit and run victim given hope through gymnastics

A NEW health initiative at the Warwick Gymnastic Club is giving a hit and run victim hope he will one day be able to bushwalk again.

Paul Reid's life was turned upside down in moments when an out of control 4WD barrelled into him while he worked in Dalmorton State Forest in December 2016.

The hit and run left him with a shattered pelvis, five cracked ribs, a minor brain injury and multiple leg injuries.

"My thigh muscle was detached, they had to operate on me to reattach it," he said.

"I still don't have much feeling in that part of my leg."

From the moment Mr Reid could start moving again he has been determined to improve his physical condition in every way he can.

 

FIGHT FOR RECOVERY: Paul Reid has started the Fitter for Life program with hope he will go bush-walking again someday.
Paul Reid has started the Fitter for Life program with Warwick Gymnastic Club. Chris Lines

This determination came to the attention of his friend Coby Walker who is also the president of the Warwick Gymnastic Club.

The gymnastics club has begun a new Fitter for Life mobility program, which targets seniors and people like Mr Reid who have movement-impairing injuries.

The program aims to help people rebuild their muscles and movement, whether they use a wheelchair, are disabled or able-bodied.

Mr Walker said the program worked with low-impact exercises like twirling ribbons or bouncing balloons to allow students to slowly develop muscle they had not used for years.

"We are wanting to improve their balance and strength so they can avoid dangerous falls and also keep doing things around the house," Mr Walker said.

"There are not many places which have the facilities we do, we can help with exercises they can't do at home."

 

FIGHT FOR RECOVERY: Paul Reid has started the Fitter for Life program with hope he will go bush-walking again someday.
Paul Reid practising stretching with a hula hoop. Chris Lines

It was the promise of these basic improvements that attracted Mr Reid to the class.

"I want to improve my mobility and my energy levels, these go hand-in-hand because fatigue sets in quickly for me and is stopping me from doing things," Mr Reid said.

While the low-impact classes are not looking to push student's boundaries, Mr Reid said he was always looking to take himself to the limit for his recovery.

"Today was the first time since my injury that I have balanced on a beam," he said.

"I am trying to get back what I had before, these days I have to appraise every situation for danger before enter it, I never used to be like that."

Mr Reid said he was hoping the classes would help him achieve his dream of going bushwalking again.

"There's this place called Mount Mitchell and when you reach the top you can see Spicers Peak on one side and Brisbane on the other," he said.

"If I could get up there comfortably and take photos like I used to, my life would be a lot more full."

The free trials of the Fitter for Life classes are running at the Warwick Gymnastic Club every Tuesday and Thursday from 10.30-11.30am.

Those interested can message the club through their Facebook page or visit them at 29 Easey St during class times.