UMISSABLE: Children happily dancing as Erin Hilton belted out a tune at the Carols in the Park in Warwick.
UMISSABLE: Children happily dancing as Erin Hilton belted out a tune at the Carols in the Park in Warwick.

NO SILENT NIGHT: Innovative plan to bring carols to you

IN A year of live gig uncertainty, one Warwick performer has an innovative solution to keep lights on this festive season.

In a recent council workshop, Ben Vellacott introduced the idea of COVID carols — a way to bring the beloved Warwick Carols in the Parks to all audiences despite restrictions.

When it looked like the event may not go ahead this year, Mr Vellacott lined up a Gold Coast professional studio to put on the “full works” for families to enjoy at home.

“The idea behind it was that given at that time Queensland was in an unknown space to run an event like that, I wanted to find a way to still create the event in a COVID-safe manner and give everyone access to it,” he said.

“Whether through your phone, laptop, iPad, you could access it without being at risk or limiting numbers.”

With years of experience performing at the carols and a mother and father closely invested in its running, Mr Vellacott said the carols’ survival was something close to his entire family’s heart.

“It’s such a great time and event for families and kids,” he said.

“To me, the carols are a cup of Rotary chips while you wait for Santa to roll in on the fire truck, or dancing to Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer.

“For some young kids, this year will be their first carols and I’d hate for them to miss the experience of such a special thing.”

LONGTIME SUPPORTERS: Performers Ben, Clayton, Morgan and Phil Vellacott have been longtime performers at the Warwick Carols, pictured here in 2012. Photo Deanna Millard / Daily News
LONGTIME SUPPORTERS: Performers Ben, Clayton, Morgan and Phil Vellacott have been longtime performers at the Warwick Carols, pictured here in 2012. Photo Deanna Millard / Daily News

With easing restrictions, it now looked like SDRC would run an on-the-ground event, but there was still hope Mr Vellacott’s idea could work in tandem with the live performance.

“We’ve seen how quickly things can change and that was spoken about, running an on-the-ground event and livestreaming as well,” he said.

“There will be people who are immuno-comprised or elderly people in care homes that won’t be able to attend.

“Whether we bring it to the community live or through the livestream, it’s a win-win.”