Warwick mother Robyn Jurgensen has fought for her son Koby Bromonlini's right to an equal education since he was diagnosed with austism spectrum disorder in June 2018.
Warwick mother Robyn Jurgensen has fought for her son Koby Bromonlini's right to an equal education since he was diagnosed with austism spectrum disorder in June 2018. Marian Faa

Parenting kids with autism a 'constant war against society'

ROBYN Jurgensen thinks people with autism are going to change the world and, in his own way, her son Koby Bormolini already has.

Koby and his mate Aiden Galloway attracted the praise of Warwick residents after they pulled more than eight shopping trolleys out of the Condamine River in January this year.

The selfless act of service was testament to Koby's helpful personality according to his mum, Miss Jurgensen.

But Koby's talents don't stop there.

He loves football and is a whiz at maths and English.

Miss Jurgensen is hopeful for a review of the way children with autism are treated in the education system so their individual talents can be nurtured.

As a parent she said there was a lack of support networks in Warwick.

"I have absolutely struggled," she said.

Little heroes Aiden Galloway (13) and Koby Bormolini (14) spent their holidays cleaning up Warwick waterways after discovering a number of shopping trolleys dumped in the Condamine River. They boys have attracted the praise and thanks of the wider community, who want to see an end to pollution.
Young heroes Aiden Galloway and Koby Bormolini attracted praise from the wider community, who want to see an end to water pollution. Contributed

"Every day I send him to school my anxiety level is so high, just wishing that he will have a good day.

"He is very sports orientated all he wants to do is be part of a group and fit in.

"But he has been bullied severely and treated so differently.

"I feel like it is a constant battle against society as a mother, trying to reverse the damage that is done and keep that anxiety level down."