LIKE A QUILT: Sonja Pohlman shared her experiences with the Women of Warwick, talking about her many careers, being a mother of an autistic child and weaving the patches of her personality together.
LIKE A QUILT: Sonja Pohlman shared her experiences with the Women of Warwick, talking about her many careers, being a mother of an autistic child and weaving the patches of her personality together. Jayden Brown

VIDEO: Pohlman's patchwork personality

Sonia Pohlman shares her story at Women of Warwick breakfast: Guest speaker Sonia Pohlman shared her life's journey with the Women of Warwick breakfast on Tuesday, from her many careers to the struggles of being a parent of an autistic child. She also stirred emotion in the crowd, playing a heart-warming rendition of the song True Colours on the cello.
Sonia Pohlman shares her story at Women of Warwick breakfast: Guest speaker Sonia Pohlman shared her life's journey with the Women of Warwick breakfast on Tuesday, from her many careers to the struggles of being a parent of an autistic child. She also stirred emotion in the crowd, playing a heart-warming rendition of the song True Colours on the cello.

SHE'S been a psychologist, a music teacher, a fitness instructor, a mother, park-runner, a Pentath-runner and played with an orchestra, but for Sonja Pohlman there are many more squares that make up her 'patchwork quilt' personality.

The multi-talented Warwick woman shared her life's journeys, from her start in music to her experiences of motherhood, with a roomful of local ladies at the Women of Warwick breakfast on Tuesday morning.

As the audience laughed, cried and smiled along with her, Mrs Pohlman compared her personality with patchwork quilt and opened up about who she was.

"It's not who we think we are, it's what we get up and do," she said.

"Once you find anything is possible, you're keen to give anything a go."

At times there was strong emotion from the inspirational local lady, especially when she spoke about the struggles of having an autistic child.

"Having an autistic child means you have to speak for them - and sometimes you don't get it right," she said.

"My children don't want me to be or need me to be perfect.

"You do not get an award being the perfect person at the end of the day."

An active park-run participant and regular Pentath-run competitor, Mrs Pohlman admitted she hadn't always been a sporty person.

"One of my firm beliefs is that I'm not good at sport, yet about four years ago I decided I love to run," she said.

"This year I did all five events in the Pentath-run and I lived to tell the tale - I've achieved things I'd never considered possible."

Aside from her love of running, the everyday mum also has a passion for music.

There wasn't a dry eye in the room when the talented musician picked up her cello and performed a beautiful rendition of the song 'True Colours'.

"Years of musical production has allowed me to return to musical teaching," she said.

"I don't have a perfect career or a career trajectory - I don't have a five-year plan.

"I want to keep adding squares to my quilt and make it a warm place to be."