SHARK NETS: Gympie region's part in the controversial drumline and beach netting program is not the worse example of the controversial practice.
SHARK NETS: Gympie region's part in the controversial drumline and beach netting program is not the worse example of the controversial practice. Contributed

Sharks: our part in the slaughter

THE good news for Gympie region beach-goers and conservationists is that very few of Queensland's culled sharks die off Rainbow Beach.

Non-target species include endangered shark species and those that are not known for being dangerous to humans.

The three nets and 12 drumlines off Rainbow Beach are part of a Queensland coastal shark control program which has been branded "archaic" by conservation groups who want it abolished.

Humane Society International and the Australian Marine Conservation Society have released video of sharks dying after being caught in drumlines.

AMCS fisheries and threatened species campaign manager Tooni Mahto said the evidence showed Queensland's "outdated and myopic" attitudes to sharks.

Fisheries Minister Mark Furner said the shark control program would continue and Queensland remained committed to the safety of people using the state's beaches.

Latest figures appear to show that Rainbow Beach did not make a significant contribution to the killing, but full figures for last calendar year show non-dangerous species and other by-catch among a haul which also included notably dangerous bull and tiger sharks.