Tom Gibson from Sunny Corner, Goondiwindi, regularly markets his sheep in Warwick.
Tom Gibson from Sunny Corner, Goondiwindi, regularly markets his sheep in Warwick. Sophie Lester

Goondiwindi sheep farmer in good shape

FROM the start of lambing season, Tom Gibson travels from Goondiwindi every fortnight for three months.

His family has been running sheep on its Sunny Corner property since 1923, and Mr Gibson has spent his entire life on the land.

"I try to buy a few grass eaters every time I come down," Mr Gibson said.

"For me I start selling (lambs) around Christmas, but it really depends on the season," he said.

Trading in both the calf and lamb markets, Mr Gibson said that while lambs were selling well, calf prices remained higher week to week.

"Lamb-wise, the market has been very good. Lambs are selling very well but some of the calves make very good money," he said.

"Some of these ones can make over $300 on a good day.

"At the big saleyard these ones (tan steers) can be making $2.80 a kilo, and the little blacks steers are making probably as much as $3.20 a kilo."

Mr Gibson has crossbred lambs to sell for meat, as well as keeping merinos for wool.

He said Queensland sheep farmers had been doing it tough in the drought, but counted himself lucky to have some good rainfall at Goondiwindi.

"Further out is a lot worse. We're in good shape at Goondiwindi," Mr Gibson said.

"The wheat farmers out there are especially happy because it's been such a good season for them and the rain's come at the right time.

"In Queensland with the summer rainfall it can be difficult to have wheat planted at the right time and get the rain when they need it."