Shocking way women are picking their bridesmaids

 

IT IS not the flowers or the perfect location that is forefront in the mind of a bride-to-be.

Will I look good in my dress? That's the big worry. And many go to great lengths to make sure no one outshines them.

New research shows that brides are so keen to be the star of the show on the big day that they choose bridesmaids based on body size.

One in 10 do not want size six, stunners lining up beside them as the cameras click and even request their bridesmaids do not lose weight. And another 10 per cent admit to choosing unflattering bridesmaid dresses.

An astonishing 46 per cent of millennial brides admit to crying when trying on their dress as they are disappointed with how they look.

As many as 15 per cent Gen Z women say they decided to have a smaller wedding as they didn't feel confident enough in their bodies to go big.

The survey on more than 1000 everyday Australians was carried out by Pure Profile and was commissioned by Jenny Craig highlights the stresses that come with the need to be insta-perfect.

"Weddings can be a stressful time for brides and the pressure to lose weight only adds to the enormous stressors they are exposed to in the lead up to their big day.

"It is important that brides feel supported during this time of their life and don't feel added pressure to succumb to crash diets which can have negative implications on one's health long-term," psychologist Dr Paula Robinson said.

Amy Gemmell on her wedding day.
Amy Gemmell on her wedding day.

Queensland woman Amy Gemmell is one of the 69 per cent of Australian women who go on a weight loss drive leading up to her wedding.

"I saw a photo of myself at a friend's wedding in a blue dress with my husband or then fiance Michael and that was the ah-ha moment. That photo shocked me into action," the new mum told The Sunday Mail.

"Every bride wants to feel great on the big day and in the end I did. I lost a total of 26 kilos and felt radiant and beautiful. I wasn't worried about the camera capturing a fat stomach. I was relaxed and confident and was so glad I had put all the work in," she said.

This is the photo that convinced Amy Gemmell, (with Michael), she must lose weight for her wedding.
This is the photo that convinced Amy Gemmell, (with Michael), she must lose weight for her wedding.

In the January of 2017 Michael proposed.

"I was at the heaviest I had ever been but he loved me regardless. Nevertheless, when he realised I was determined to drop the kilos he supported me all the way."

The couple married on April 26 last year.

Amy lost the first 20 kilos by eating Jenny Craig food she then switched to intermittent fasting where she would drink only water and a coffee for one or two days a week. The rest of the week she ate a healthy balanced diet.

"We had a small wedding with no adult bridesmaids. If I had chosen to have a big wedding I would have picked my good friend who is stunning. How I felt about myself after weight loss was not about comparing myself to anyone else. I did this for me," Amy said.

Amy Gemmell at home in South Ripley with her son Carter Muir, 5 months. Picture: AAP/John Gass
Amy Gemmell at home in South Ripley with her son Carter Muir, 5 months. Picture: AAP/John Gass

The couple now have a beautiful little boy, Carter.

"The weight loss helped me to get pregnant as I have been through some medical issues. So it's changed everything for the better," she said.

WEIGHT OF A WEDDING DAY

69 per cent of brides try to lose weight for big day

46 per cent brides cry when they try dress as unhappy with how they look

Millennial brides opt for intermittent fasting

One in 10 brides ask bridesmaids not to lose weight

55 per cent brides want to lose more than four kilos

One in four buy a dress that's too small to spark weight loss

One in 10 pick unflattering bridesmaid dresses