The Warwick Rodeo and Show Society Carcass Competition judging is under way. There'll be a public viewing of the entrants from 10am on Saturday, October 6 at the Carey Brothers Abattoir in Yangan.
The Warwick Rodeo and Show Society Carcass Competition judging is under way. There'll be a public viewing of the entrants from 10am on Saturday, October 6 at the Carey Brothers Abattoir in Yangan. Michael Nolan

The Melbourne Cup of carcass comps is under way

THEY call it the Australian Open of abattoirs, the Melbourne Cup of carcass competitions and the Bathurst of butchery.

Yes, we are talking about the Warwick Rodeo and Show Society's Prime Lamb Carcass Competition and it's back again for another year.

A full 85 trade lambs were processed at the Carey Brothers Abattoir yesterday ahead of the judging on Saturday, October 6.

Bill Gross is the chairman of the Rodeo's Carcass Competition Committee and he said any rumours of the drought affecting the quality of this year's offerings were untrue.

"They're as good as any other year and the numbers are nearly equal," he said.

Most of the lambs are reared on grain, which insulated them from the whims of drought. Given the prestige associated with the awards there's more than enough reason to fork out for this high-priced grain getting around.

"It really is equally as good the Brisbane Exhibition Carcass Competition," Mr Gross said .

"They are coming in from all different directions from the Northern New South Wales and Central Queensland and out west."

There were whispers at the Warwick Saleyards that some producers held off bringing their best lambs to market in a bid to hold them for the carcass competition.

Numbers were down for a second week in a row allowing some wild theories to simmer.

But TopX Agent George McVeigh put those rumours to bed.

"That is most definitely not true," he said

"While that competition is the Melbourne Cup of the carcass competitions it doesn't affect the numbers at the saleyards."

"Isolated pens meant extreme rates of some of the better lambs but that's always the case when quantity is short, but quality lambs always sell well."

The carcass competition judging is under way. There will be a public viewing of the entrants from 10am on Saturday, October 6 at the Carey Brothers Abattoir in Yangan.

Presentations start at noon.

Mr McVeigh said there would be some great work on display.

"It's so important to see what the lamb industry is doing," he said.

"I'd thoroughly encourage anyone who wants to see what we're up to come out."