HAND OVER: Emma Cannon's daughter Charlotte helps to deliver the first of the donated water to Bunnings' employee Hollie Cogill at the Bunnings Toowoomba North collection point.
HAND OVER: Emma Cannon's daughter Charlotte helps to deliver the first of the donated water to Bunnings' employee Hollie Cogill at the Bunnings Toowoomba North collection point.

Town pitches in after schools left without drinking water

AFTER learning some schools in the Granite Belt are without drinkable water, the Crows Nest community has collected hundreds of slabs of water in a matter of days.

Mum-of-four Emma Cannon, who is helping to organise the town's donations, said children suffering from the drought resonated with many in the small community.

"I have four small children myself, two of whom are in school," Ms Cannon said

"I couldn't imagine what it would be like knowing my kids are going to school and there was no drinking water accessible and at one stage they didn't have water to flush the toilet. It breaks my heart.

"If this were to happen in Crows Nest, we would like to think others would be there to help us out."

Schools in the Granite Belt have been forced to switch to rainwater tanks as drought conditions continue. Water has been trucked in to support amenities, however the schools remain without sanitised drinking water.

Ms Cannon first learned about these dire conditions from a Facebook post. She is now working in conjunction with the team at Bunnings Toowoomba North, one of the collection points for the original drive.

"Nothing can survive without water," Ms Cannon said.

"I made a Facebook post to the Crows Nest Community page. Within 16 hours my husband Rod, myself and the community had got 23 slabs of water together.

"I was pleasantly surprised, but at the same time I wasn't. I knew people from our beautiful little community would get behind it because they always do."

As the slabs pile up, more stories of generosity pour in.

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The Crows Nest IGA, run by Paul and Clare McClellan, is a smaller business that has opened its stocks for those in need. The pair have pledged to donate 100 slabs of water to match those already collected.

Residents in turn have worked to support the business, purchasing much of the water from the store.

Once collected, the slabs of water will be transported to Bunnings Toowoomba North before they are distributed to schools in the Applethorpe and Stanthorpe region by the Water for the West group.

Those looking to donate bottled water to the cause can do so at Bunnings Toowoomba North or by contacting the Water for the West Facebook page.