RESTRICTIONS STILL AT PLAY: Condamine Sports Club will have to keep the beer off tap for a little while longer, as they await a COVID Safe Industry plan to be released.
RESTRICTIONS STILL AT PLAY: Condamine Sports Club will have to keep the beer off tap for a little while longer, as they await a COVID Safe Industry plan to be released.

What’s a pub without the banter? How new rules affect you

A BEER at the bar won’t be the same at the Condamine Sports Club while coronavirus regulations remain at large.

While restrictions were eased at midday on June 1 – now allowing up to 20 patrons at clubs and pubs at one time – patrons must be seated and served by a staff member.

Club manager Stephen Domjahn said social distancing requirements would impact on the “social nature” of drinking at pubs and clubs.

“People like going to the pub and having a drink – they want to socialise as well,” he said.

“With all of this distancing it will change the whole dynamic of (drinking at a pub).

“That’s what we’ve kind of lost at the moment, the social aspect.”

It is expected that from June 5, clubs and pubs with a COVID Safe industry plan will be able to trade with more than 20 patrons, if designated zones are established.

Deputy Premier and Health Minister Steven Miles said the rule would create more job opportunities for staff looking to go back to work.

“Every venue must continue to adhere to strict social distancing rules including limiting each patron to an area of four square metres and adhere to hygiene protocols,” he said.

“I know many Queenslanders will look forward to having a drink out. It will be a different experience – you will need to be seated and served by a waiter. Crowds standing at a bar doesn’t support social distancing.

“I ask that people be patient as businesses get ready for this new stage and understand that staff are doing their best to help you enjoy more activities.”

Under the clause, the Condamine Sports Club would be able to cater for up to 60 people throughout three designated area, when the rule comes into effect.

Mr Domjahn was hopeful the community would be receptive to restaurants reopening, and willing to support businesses out of the difficult time.

“I think there will be some people a little scared,” he said.

“But as long as the clubs and pubs do what is required and being a coronavirus safe environment, a lot of people will start to realise it’s not a time to stay inside.

“We just want to be there for the community and say please come in and have a drink. It’s been a slow process but a lot of my regulars, they like coming in and just like to eat, drink and go.”