THE BEST OF THE BEST: Hudson's Pies staff from 1955 including owners Hetty (third from left) and Bluey (far right) Hudson.
THE BEST OF THE BEST: Hudson's Pies staff from 1955 including owners Hetty (third from left) and Bluey (far right) Hudson.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? 10 years after Hudson’s Pies

THERE are two types of people who live in Warwick: those who have eaten a Hudson’s Pie, and those who have never experienced true joy.

This month marks 10 years since the iconic pie shop finally shut its doors to the meat-hungry masses, relegating the mouth-watering memories to the history books.

Hudson’s Pies were a destination for many tourists, having gained notoriety across the state.
Hudson’s Pies were a destination for many tourists, having gained notoriety across the state.

For Warwick resident Kelvin Windle, the death of Hudson’s Pies was “almost as bad as the death of (his) dog, Hudson”.

“Yes, he was named after Hudson’s Pies because it was the first thing he ate in the smoko room at work after I picked him up as a pup,” he said.

Long-time resident Doug Cutmore said he’d never quite tried a pie, or a pastry, as good as those from Hudson’s Pies.

“I had many a pie, I can tell you,” Mr Cutmore said.

“On a Saturday night I would ride my horse into town and I’d tie it up and walk up from there to the King’s Theatre.

“On the way home, of an eve, I would always pick up a pie.”

The recipe was first developed by Blue Hudson in the 1930s, and passed onto his successor Daryl Fitzgerald in 1982.

The taste of a “Supreem” pie still lingers in the memory of many Warwick residents.
The taste of a “Supreem” pie still lingers in the memory of many Warwick residents.

Daryl would go on to craft an estimated 9.6 million pies before selling the store, and its secret recipe, to Adam and Sarah Butler.

The couple ran the store between 2007 and 2010, eventually shutting the doors, blaming a weak economic climate.

“I don’t know what they did, whether they didn’t have the same recipe, or they changed it, but it was never the same,” Mr Cutmore said.

“I tried it once and I told myself never again.”

Though it has been over a decade since the closure, Warwick continues to wax lyrical about the “meat that meets you at the first bite”, prompting the Daily News to investigate what happened to the key players from so long ago.

The Hudsons lived a full and happy retirement, in a brick home they built on the corner of Percy and Dragon St, where they were known for keeping a lovely yard.

The Fitzgeralds are self-professed private people, who have stayed out of the public eye and declined to be interviewed.

They do, however, continue to live in Warwick and Darren, Daryl’s son, occasionally pops up on social media to playfully taunt the locals.

“We just had some original Hudson’s Pies,” he commented, on a Facebook post lamenting Warwick’s loss.

“They were awesome!”

Marco Gliori was stoked to have secured a small piece of Southern Downs history.
Marco Gliori was stoked to have secured a small piece of Southern Downs history.

One of the old signs has found its way into the hands of Southern Downs Councillor Marco Gliori, whose mate discovered it at a local garage sale.

The little piece of history reminds Mr Gliori of his childhood, buying pies from the cart outside his primary school.

When asked if he ever tried a pie as good, Cr Gliori didn’t hesitate for a second.

“No! There’s none that you could say have that peppery sort of taste, contained in a nice little firm sort of receptacle you could pull the top off, without it sagging in the middle.”