LIVE EXPORT: Australian cattle being loaded into a truck in Jakarta.
LIVE EXPORT: Australian cattle being loaded into a truck in Jakarta. AFP

Yangan farmer fears politicial 'death-ball'

THE looming federal election has many farmers worried for the future of their business.

Yangan cattle farmer Alan Doust counts himself among those concerned, having recently sold half his cattle.

"If Labor stops the live exports it is going to be a death-ball for farmers,” he said.

"Last time they stopped it, people had thousands of cattle ready to go.”

While the live export trading does not have a huge market in the Warwick area, for farmers up in North Queensland and the Northern Territory it is a core part of their business.

Mr Doust said the trade is good way to shift cattle, which is particularly important for an industry struggling with drought and the cost of feed.

He was also sceptical about the animal welfare concerns.

"Farmers do not want their livestock damaged or harmed, when they are slaughtered we make sure they are not stressed,” he said.

Currently, Labor's Agriculture Minister Joel Fitzgibbon has vowed to maintain the live export of cattle, but the party wants exporters to be held legally accountable for their welfare even after arrival.